The Prompter Room

For Tuesday, June 11, 2019:

 

… You may not be a visual artist. But maybe you’re one of those “crazy” people who still sees hopeful possibilities in a world that others say is going to hell in a handbasket. If so, DON’T LET THE CYNICS DO EYE SURGERY ON YOU! …

Parker J. Palmer, Facebook post 6/9/19

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The Prompter Room

For Friday, June 7, 2019:

 

… I’m scared at how it will turn out, but being an artist means taking risks and making mistakes and growing and learning from those mistakes. I’m doing pretty damn well so far. #digitalartist #selfteaching

A friend’s post on Facebook 6/7/19, used with permission (h/t ML)

The Prompter Room

For Tuesday, June 4, 2019:

 

I cannot say exactly how nature exerts its calming and organizing effects on our brains, but I have seen in my patients the restorative and healing powers of nature and gardens, even for those who are deeply disabled neurologically. In many cases, gardens and nature are more powerful than any medication.

Oliver Sacks, ‘Why We Need Gardens,’ EVERYTHING IN ITS PLACE: FIRST LOVES AND LAST TALES (h/t BrainPickings)

The Prompter Room

For Tuesday, May 28, 2019:

 

[The] kind of deep attention that we pay as children is something that I cherish, that I think we all can cherish and reclaim — because attention is the doorway to gratitude, the doorway to wonder, the doorway to reciprocity. And it worries me greatly that today’s children can recognize 100 corporate logos and fewer than 10 plants. That means they’re not paying attention.

Robin Wall Kimmerer, ‘The Intelligence in All Kinds of Life,’ an On Being conversation with Krista Tippett (h/t BrainPickings)

The Prompter Room

The trick is to maintain a kind of naive amazement at each instant of experience—but, as Montaigne learned, one of the best techniques for doing this is to write about everything. Simply describing an object on your table, or the view from your window, opens your eyes to how marvelous such ordinary things are. To look inside yourself is to open up an even more fantastical realm …

Observing the play of inner states is the writer’s job. Yet this was not a common notion before Montaigne, and his peculiarly restless, free-form way of doing it was entirely unknown.

Sarah Bakewell, HOW TO LIVE: OR A LIFE OF MONTAIGNE IN ONE QUESTION AND TWENTY ATTEMPTS AT AN ANSWER (h/t BrainPickings)

The Prompter Room

For Tuesday, May 21, 2019:

 

We’re not really taught how to recreate constructively. We need to do more than find diversions; we need to restore and expand ourselves. Our idea of relaxing is all too often to plop down in front of the television set and let its pandering idiocy liquefy our brains. Shutting off the thought process is not rejuvenating; the mind is like a car battery — it recharges by running.

Cartoonist Bill Watterson, commencement address at his alma mater of Kenyon College on May 20, 1990

The Prompter Room

For Friday, May 10, 2019:

 

Though the library was quiet, whispered conversations might start in the stacks — two of you, perhaps, were searching for the same old book, the same bound volumes of Brain from 1890 — and conversations could lead to friendships. All of us in the library were reading our own books, absorbed in our own worlds, and yet there was a sense of community, even intimacy. The physicality of books — along with their places and their neighbors on the bookshelves — was part of this camaraderie: handling books, sharing them, passing them to one another, even seeing the names of previous readers and the dates they took books out.

Oliver Sacks, ‘Libraries,’ EVERYTHING IN ITS PLACE: FIRST LOVES AND LAST TALES