The Prompter Room

For Tuesday, February 26, 2019:

 

The highest goal of music is to connect one’s soul to their Divine Nature, not entertainment.

Pythagoras

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The Prompter Room

For Tuesday, January 29, 2019:

 

Silence is an integral part of all good music. Compared with Beethoven’s or Mozart’s, the ceaseless torrent of Wagner’s music is very poor in silence. Perhaps that is one of the reasons why it seems so much less significant than theirs. It “says” less because it is always speaking.

Aldous Huxley, ‘The Rest is Silence,’ MUSIC AT NIGHT AND OTHER ESSAYS

The Prompter Room

For Friday, April 6, 2018:

 

If I had my life to live over again, I would have made a rule to read some poetry and listen to some music at least once a week, for perhaps the parts of my brain now atrophied would thus have been kept active through use. The loss of these tastes is a loss of happiness, and may possibly be injurious to the intellect, and more probably the moral character, by enfeebling the emotional part of our nature.

Charles Darwin (h/t to JB via YD)

The Prompter Room

For Friday, December 29, 2017:

 

A man should hear a little music, read a little poetry, and see a fine picture every day of his life, in order that worldly cares may not obliterate the sense of the beautiful which God has implanted in the human soul.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

(h/t to Phibby for the source)

The Prompter Room

For Friday, December 15, 2017:

 

 

We’re all — trees, humans, insects, birds, bacteria — pluralities. Life is embodied network. These living networks are not places of omnibenevolent Oneness. Instead, they are where ecological and evolutionary tensions between cooperation and conflict are negotiated and resolved. These struggles often result not in the evolution of stronger, more disconnected selves but in the dissolution of the self into relationship.

Because life is network, there is no “nature” or “environment,” separate and apart from humans. We are part of the community of life, composed of relationships with “others,” so the human/nature duality that lives near the heart of many philosophies is, from a biological perspective, illusory. We are not, in the words of the folk hymn, wayfaring strangers traveling through this world. Nor are we the estranged creatures of Wordsworth’s lyrical ballads, fallen out of Nature into a “stagnant pool” of artifice where we misshape “the beauteous forms of things.” Our bodies and minds, our “Science and Art,” are as natural and wild as they ever were.

We cannot step outside life’s songs. This music made us; it is our nature.

Our ethic must therefore be one of belonging, an imperative made all the more urgent by the many ways that human actions are fraying, rewiring, and severing biological networks worldwide. To listen to trees, nature’s great connectors, is therefore to learn how to inhabit the relationships that give life its source, substance, and beauty.

David George Haskell, THE SONGS OF TREES: STORIES FROM NATURE’S GREAT  CONNECTORS

The Prompter Room

For Tuesday, December 12, 2017:

 

Children speak the language of the flowers and understand the whispers of the wind.  They’re in tune with the subtle songs of the forest; they can listen to the trees, interpret the chatter of the rivers, and intuit the meaning of each sparkle of sun.

Our job isn’t to correct that, but to nurture it, to preserve it, and perhaps even remember it ourselves.

Cristen Rodgers, meme on Facebook (cristenrodgers.net)